Paul Welch

On Fantasy, Writing & the Journey to Publication

Tag Archives: creativity

Time to Update

Hi friends,

I sincerely apologize for not being very active on the blog over the past two months. I’ve been a busy boy – working full-time at a job that gives me tons in tips, rehearsing full-time for a show that’s in the Edmonton and Vancouver Fringe Festival, and launching my own theatre company – Third Street Theatre (www.thirdstreet.ca).

So I have been quite busy, with so many projects on the go. Last count had me at 95 hours/week of work, and I don’t think I’ve had a day off in six weeks. It’s a pretty rigorous and exhausting schedule.

That being said, I have had continued interest from the literary agent in my book, and he is working with me on fixing some of the issues regarding pacing. My only challenge is to grab some time to dedicate to revisiting the manuscript.

I have had a seven month break from the book, which I am sure has given me loads of perspective. I am hoping that in the next couple of months I’ll be able to find a couple of days to really dedicate myself to editing again, so that we might be able to continue on this path.. and hopefully lead to official representation.

There are so many exciting things going on in my life, and the Universe seems to keep sending more projects my way. It’s hard to complain about it (although, I find myself complaining that I am tired, have no time, and no social life.. which isn’t a fun story to be telling all the time).

I can make no guarantees that I will be blogging every day, but I will do my best to write a post now and then – especially as I move forward with editing the manuscript.

All the best, and cheers.

Paul

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Style Stalker: Author Gets Stalked

I was stalked on the streets of Calgary and asked about my style! It was a super fun shoot, and I am flattered to be included.

It’s a blog where they showcase the random stylings of local Calgarians as they move to and fro about the city. Everything I’m wearing is relatively new, with the coat, shoes, and belt found on huge sale discounts.

Check it out, friends! Head on over to Avenue Magazine’s Style Stalker Blog.

Love What You Write: The Challenge of Short Stories

I’ve decided to answer a call-for-submissions for a short story anthology.

The anthology in question is Tesseracts 16: Parnassus Unbound. It’s being produced by Calgary publishing firm EDGE/Tesseracts Books, and, to quote the website:

“Submissions should focus on art, music, literature and cultural elements which are integral to the story. This anthology will reflect as broad a spectrum of stories as possible; highlighting unique styles and manners.”

Sounds like a cool opportunity to write a nifty fantasy short story, doesn’t it? I thought so, too. I never thought it was going to be so challenging, though.

My first task was to figure out the “trick” to writing short stories. As it turns out, it’s the same as writing any story – only shorter. Go figure.

I did come across a couple of tips, though:

Every word counts. Make sure that every sentence either furthers plot, action, character, or world building. Any sentence that doesn’t touch on one – or more – of the above points needs to be revisited. Or else, you’re hooped.

Story structure is key. You know: exposition, inciting incident, rising action, climax, denoument/resolution. All that jazz. It can be 3-act, 5-point, or 7-point structure – whichever you prefer – but stick to a tried-and-true structure, and you’ll be fine.

But what I wasn’t expecting?

Being given limitations / restrictions as guidelines can complicate things.

This blew my mind. As an actor, I love restrictions. The more restrictions you give me, the more creative I get. For instance, if I tell you to get up and improvise a 15-minute monologue, chances are you’ll soil yourself and stammer and mumble aimlessly. It would be a traumatic experience for all involved.

However, if I tell you to improvise a 15-minute monologue as a young girl who goes looking for her run-away dog and comes across a mysterious triangular-shaped stone that transports her to a world of talking plants where she must go on an adventure to find the Paramion Seed, granting her the special elemental powers needed to return home…

Chances are you’ll succeed.

I thought the same thing would happen with this short story. It has very specific (although definitely not simplistic) limitations, and limitations are the key to creativity.

And limitations can be awesome.

But they can also be limiting.

I am working on building a specific, marketable product: the fantasy world I created. I plan on writing 30+ novels that take place in this world, because I know it so well. I’ve literally spent decades and tens of tens of housands of hours developing the world. I know it inside and out, and I love it. I love it to bits.

So naturally, I wanted to write a short story set in this world.

Correction: I wanted to write a short story – that would be selected for this anthology – set in this world.

But the requirements / theme of the anthology? Now there’s a fly in the mimosa.

I dove head first into the first idea that came to mind, and wrote 2500 words. I challenged myself and learned a lot about telling vs. showing, and I played with some narrative techniques I was looking to explore.  But ultimately, the required theme of the submission became a gimmick, rather than a central core value of the story. In that way, it was a fail.

So I did a little more research, and came across some essential advice:

Write what you love.

I think this is an important message that we all must take home. We should always write what we love. Sure, we sometimes have to write things we’re not too gung-ho about, but I think it is imperative that we find something to love. We need to force ourselves to find it. Growth will happen as a result, and isn’t that the saving grace of the “art” of writing? I think so.

I am happy to say that I’ve started a new short story and I’ve written 1,600 words. I still have a ways to go, but I’m digging it, and I am looking forward to continuing to work on it. Whether it’ll succeed and be published in this anthology, I do not know. But I do know that I’ll have loved every moment of that, and at the end of the day, that is an accomplishment worth celebrating.

How often do you write for specific competitions, anthologies, or markets? Do you find it challenging, or an awesome opportunity to push yourself and grow as an artist? What are some tips and tricks you’ve developed along the way when it comes to writing short stories? Please share your wisdom in the comments below – we’d love to hear your thoughts.

Creative Goals: Using “Life Maps” to Get Your Desires

We’re all familiar with goals. Their origins lie in our basic human needs. “I need shelter” becomes a goal for protection, habitat, and safety. “I need food” turns into a goal for finding sustenance. We get better at achieving these goals, and the goals evolve. We evolve with them, until eventually our wants and desires become the primary motivator for our goals, rather than our needs.

But is the context for our “want goals” as strong as our “need goals”? And is there anything we can do to harness the power of our innate ability to set (and achieve) such goals?

Last night, I read Kristen Lamb’sAre You There Blog? It’s Me, Writer.” In it, she speaks often of the power of positive thought and goal setting, for it directs your thoughts and conscious energy into bringing something into fruition. I view it as literally programming your brain (or spirit/Universe/God) to make your desires happen.

Goals play an important role in my life and career, and I’ve been amazed at how strongly the act of setting goals can change my life and help manifest my desires.

Over a decade ago, I was introduced to the idea of “Life Mapping.” This technique involves identifying the desires in our life – present, short- and long-term future goals – and engaging in an act of “creative meditation” to formalize and direct our thoughts and energy toward achieving it.

In a nut shell, the technique involves four steps:

  1. Identify What You Want. This can be personal, emotional, financial, or professional. Anything is fair game. Dream big, but be certain it’s something you really want. And here’s the kicker: you must be specific. The more specific the goal(s) – the more details and parameters you set – the better.
  2. Get Creative. Sit down with a journal and write your goals down. Create a collage to help visualize the goal. Get as creative as you like: cut out pictures, doodle, use colors and fabrics. Go crazy. You are consciously putting effort and directed energy into your thoughts and literally manifesting them on paper.
  3. Be Positive and Present. Refer to the goal in the present tense, as though you already have it. Express gratitude for having it in your life. For instance: “I have a very favorable book deal with Del Rey for my fantasy manuscript. It’s everything I’ve ever wanted, and I am so grateful that my incredible agent negotiated it for me.” Don’t worry about how it sounds. Let it rip – but be specific.
  4. Create the Life Map For You Alone. The journal is not to be shared. Once you’ve completed your creative meditation and your collage, you’re not supposed to look at it again. Store it away under lock and key. Why? It protects the goal from our destructive “Judge” that’ll look for ways to belittle and undermine it, seeding it with negativity. Create the Life Map and pack it away, literally out of sight and out of mind.

This is an active, creative way to formalize setting goals. It might appeal to some, but not to others – and that’s okay. But you might not enjoy writing your goals on post-it notes, or feel like the 2 seconds you spent jotting down 10 New Year’s Resolutions was somehow insincere, and this might be more up your ally.

By taking 20 minutes to consciously give attention to the manifestation of a goal, you might be surprized at what can happen. And if you wanted, you could consider it a writing prompt to challenge your craft – and simultaneously meet the “write 200 words a day” post-it goal you made last week.

Recently, when I was going through my boxes in my parent’s basement, I came across one of my old Life Maps. A decade ago, I used this technique to plan a couple of things I wanted in my life: to be a full member of the professional actor’s union, and to be recognized for my work with an award.

In 2011, nine years after I sat down to put my wants and desires onto paper through creative meditation, both dreams came to fruition. I became a full member of the union, and I received a Best Actor award for my work in the professional theatre.

And you know what’s interesting? My Life Maps had a specific time-frame… of 10 years.

What are your favorite ways to set goals? Do you have creative method that might interest us? Do you have a personal success story with setting – and meeting – your goals? Please share in the comments below – I’d love to hear them!