Paul Welch

On Fantasy, Writing & the Journey to Publication

Category Archives: platform

Time to Update

Hi friends,

I sincerely apologize for not being very active on the blog over the past two months. I’ve been a busy boy – working full-time at a job that gives me tons in tips, rehearsing full-time for a show that’s in the Edmonton and Vancouver Fringe Festival, and launching my own theatre company – Third Street Theatre (www.thirdstreet.ca).

So I have been quite busy, with so many projects on the go. Last count had me at 95 hours/week of work, and I don’t think I’ve had a day off in six weeks. It’s a pretty rigorous and exhausting schedule.

That being said, I have had continued interest from the literary agent in my book, and he is working with me on fixing some of the issues regarding pacing. My only challenge is to grab some time to dedicate to revisiting the manuscript.

I have had a seven month break from the book, which I am sure has given me loads of perspective. I am hoping that in the next couple of months I’ll be able to find a couple of days to really dedicate myself to editing again, so that we might be able to continue on this path.. and hopefully lead to official representation.

There are so many exciting things going on in my life, and the Universe seems to keep sending more projects my way. It’s hard to complain about it (although, I find myself complaining that I am tired, have no time, and no social life.. which isn’t a fun story to be telling all the time).

I can make no guarantees that I will be blogging every day, but I will do my best to write a post now and then – especially as I move forward with editing the manuscript.

All the best, and cheers.

Paul

The Importance of Space

I have taken a 3-month break from working on my manuscript. It wasn’t that my life got too busy, as I certainly had a fair amount of “free time” that I could have invested into my manuscript, and it wasn’t because I lost interest in the work. My love of the story hadn’t changed, nor had my passion to become a published writer.

I had burned out.

The expression “burning the candle at both ends” exists for a reason. Sometimes we get carried away and try to do too much. That’s what happened to me.

I was cast in a wonderful piece of children’s theatre that took me to Edmonton for almost six weeks. It was a wonderful two-person play that was high energy and fast-moving and it demanded a lot of commitment and focus. I made a lot of physical and vocal choices, and I did my best to give it my all.

In the professional theatre, you typically work 6 days a week rehearsing to put a show up. Add to that my decision to walk 10 km a day to and from the theatre and we’re talking about a 55 hour/week time commitment. Seems like more than enough, doesn’t it?

But what did I do?

I decided to also continue to aggressively work on my book and learn about the publishing industry. I learned about platform, and the importance and impact it apparently has in the modern publishing world (and I promise I’ll write a blog post on platform at some point.) I learned about writing and editing. I tried to stay abreast of the changing world of publishing – and boy, is it ever changing fast. I read e-books on the craft and the business, and bought a number of fantasy novels to understand what others were doing and how.

It was too much.

Some nights, I didn’t even sleep. I tried to, but my brain kept going and it kept me awake. I’d lie in bed and feel like I was wasting time, so the lights would go back on and I’d get back to work.

I probably spent another 35 hours / week working on the book. On top of my 55 hours / week, the candle faded fast.

So I needed time to recover, and I did my best not to feel guilty about that.

Fast-forward three months to today.

I have just come back from a week-long Artist in Residency contract in Lethbridge where I worked with Pre-Kindergarten, Kindergarten, and Grade 1 students on the topic of diversity. Together, we created a play that was 100% developed from their imaginations. And boy, do they ever have wonderful imaginations!

I feel rested and recharged (even though the week was exhausting) and last night I sent an e-mail out to the literary agent who has been reading the partial of IN THE SHADOWS OF THE DAWN inquiring about the status of my book.

All this to say: I finally feel ready to get back to work on taking the manuscript to the next level.

It needs some more editing and I have some ideas of scenes that I think should be cut. There are a couple of thematic moments that I think need to be highlighted a little bit more. And I’m certainly curious to see what 3 months of rest does to my reading of the story. I am certain I am going to see it with fresh eyes and find a number of things that I missed in my previous edits.

So stay tuned! I think I’ve found a new candle to burn.. but this time I’m going to be careful not to burn it on both ends.

Have you ever burned yourself out? How did it happen, and what steps did you take to recover? What lessons have you learned? Please share your stories in the comments below. I’m sure we could all benefit from hearing each other’s experiences!

How We Spend Our Cash: A Reader’s Responsibility

As writers, we focus on developing a platform – the friends, fans, and colleagues who have a vested interest in our work. It’s what drives sales, playing an important role in dictating our successes or failures. And if we achieve any sort of success, our platform can grow exponentially. Our reach – and influence – explodes.

Public figures have huge platforms. Indeed, their platforms can extend beyond the scope of those who actively participate in the “work” they produce. Not everyone watches Jersey Shore, but most of us have an idea of who Snooki is – perhaps  through newspaper articles, interviews, commercials, or water-cooler gossip. (She even has a New York Times best-selling book, but let’s be very clear: her ghost writer is a NYT best-selling author, not her.)

Sometimes celebrities say or do things that irk us. For instance, Mark Whalberg recently made an insensitive blunder by claiming he’s a real-life superhero and shoulda-coulda-woulda changed the events of 9/11. He’s since gone on to apologize.

It makes me consider the moral and ethical responsibilities and implications of platform.

Some very successful writers have allowed their politics to creep into their platform, becoming very vocal about their beliefs – be it religion, sexual orientation, political parties, etc. In fact, it may even be another aspect of their platform. But very personal opinions and beliefs suddenly become highly public and political.

Now, we all have beliefs, including some that we’re willing to get aggressive about – be it emotionally, physically, politically, or financially. We are right in our belief, and others are wrong. Absolutely, 100%, irrefutably wrong, and we’ll use everything at our disposal to ensure our belief is maintained, that other beliefs are squished. This doesn’t make it right, but it’s an aspect of the human condition.

So what happens when a high-profile writer uses their platform to further their “controversial” belief? What happens when our support and readership – as expressed through the purchasing of the product they release – allows them to fund their aggressive actions towards the furthering their beliefs?

What are our moral and ethical responsibilities as readers?

We want to stay current, and we want to read the books that are extremely popular. But if those authors use the cash generated from the sale of their books to further their own agenda, we are funding a belief that we don’t wholly support.

To be clear:

  • Author X writes book Q.
  • Book Q is awesome and has huge success.
  • But, Author X believes A, and is very vocal/political about said belief.
  • Author X uses the millions of dollars of income generated from book Q to fund / support / further belief A.
  • We believe that belief A is wrong.
  • If we purchase book Q, we are funding Author X’s opposing belief.

See what I’m getting at here?

It’s a challenging topic, and it can generate a lot of controversy. We pay attention to it when it comes to the food we eat, the places we support or boycott, the products we purchase – from organizations and even countries – but do we consider it with the books and films we purchase and view?

What are your thoughts? Should readers support popular literature produced by authors who finance diametrically opposed beliefs? Should we educate ourselves about the personal beliefs of the authors we read and make our purchases based on how well their belief lines up with our own?

Please comment below and share your thoughts – but let’s keep it a constructive debate.